Articles

Perceived barriers to the development of the antimicrobial stewardship role of the nurse in intensive care: Views of healthcare professionals

J Rout, P Brysiewicz

Abstract


Background. Antimicrobial stewardship has become an important initiative within intensive care units in the global fight against antimicrobial resistance. Support for nurses to participate in and actively direct antimicrobial stewardship interventions is growing however, there may be barriers that impede the development of this nursing role.

Objectives. To explore the views of healthcare professionals regarding barriers to the antimicrobial stewardship role of the nurse in intensive care in a private hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Methods. Using a qualitative research approach, purposive sampling was used to identify fifteen participants from the disciplines of nursing, surgery, anaesthetics, internal medicine, microbiology, and pharmacy in a general intensive care unit. Content analysis was used to code data obtained from each individual interview.

Results. The following categories and subcategories were derived: regarding barriers to the role of the nurse in antimicrobial stewardship: (i) lack of collaboration (subcategories: not participating in the antimicrobial stewardship programme, no feedback about antimicrobial resistance in the unit, and not part of decision-making); (ii) inadequate knowledge (subcategories: not understanding infection prevention and control, missing the link between laboratory results and start of treatment, and poor knowledge of antibiotics and their administration); and (iii) inexperienced nurses (subcategories: shortage of intensive care nurses, lack of experienced nurses, and inadequate nursing staff to provide in-service training).

Conclusion. The nursing role within antimicrobial stewardship was negatively affected by both staffing and collaborative difficulties, which impacted on the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship within the unit


Authors' affiliations

J Rout, School of Nursing and Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

P Brysiewicz, School of Nursing and Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

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Cite this article

Southern African Journal of Critical Care 2020;36(1):51-56. DOI:10.7196/SAJCC.2020.v36i1.410

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-07-30
Date published: 2020-07-30

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