Articles

Reducing paediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia – a South African challenge!

Heide Kunzmann, Konstantinos Dimitriades, Brenda May Morrow, Andrew Charles Argent

Abstract


There has been a decline in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in the paediatric intensive care units of developed countries. Previous
studies at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital give an incidence of VAP of >40/1 000 ventilator days, identifying VAP as a priority
area for practice improvement. We outline the process and outcome of a practice improvement initiative that implemented an evidence-based
bundle of care to reduce VAP. In 2011, this initiative was taken to improve healthcare-associated infections, with the support of the ‘Best Care
Always’ project. A task team identified an evidence-based bundle of care aimed at reducing VAP. The bundle consisted of five elements that
were adjusted practically to suit the unit. Standardised metrics to measure compliance with the bundle and outcomes of the intervention were
instituted and collected prospectively throughout the study period. Following implementation in October 2011, VAP rates decreased from
55/1 000 to 19.1/1 000 ventilator days over the first 5-month period. During this period, compliance remained poor and metrics were poorly
collected. With the introduction of a full-time VAP coordinator, compliance improved from 57% to a peak of 83%, with a decrease in VAP
to an average of 4/1 000 ventilator days (January 2013 - July 2013). This practice improvement initiative resulted in a significant reduction in
VAP. The success of this initiative is attributed equally to the introduction of the bundle of care and driving power of the VAP coordinator.


Authors' affiliations

Heide Kunzmann, Department of Critical Care, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Konstantinos Dimitriades, Department of Critical Care, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Brenda May Morrow, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Andrew Charles Argent, Department of Critical Care, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa

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Keywords

Ventilator Associated Pneumonia, VAP, VAP Coordinator, Practice Improvement

Cite this article

Southern African Journal of Critical Care 2016;32(1):17. DOI:10.7196/SAJCC.2016.v32i1.243

Article History

Date submitted: 2015-07-05
Date published: 2016-07-26

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